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Rohingya: Chased from Myanmar, unwelcome in Bangladesh

Bangladesh pushes on with Rohingya island plan

‘I grabbed my children and ran towards the forest, and waited there with several hundred people.’

Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh – Ambia Khatun grabbed her two children and dashed out of her burning house on the early morning of November 23 last year. A teary-eyed Khatun said her husband could not make out of the house as the army started firing.

Thirty-seven-year-old Khatun is from Kearipara village in western Myanmar’s Maungdaw town. She says she fled along with other Rohingya families, leaving behind her husband’s body, as rows of houses were set on fire by the army.

Along with 2,500 Rohingya families, she has taken refuge at a makeshift camp in Leda at eastern Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar near the border with Myanmar.

“I grabbed my children and ran towards the forest and waited there with several hundred people,” she told Al Jazeera at her camp in Leda village.

World Food Programme and other local NGOs have come forward to provide food and emergency medical aid, as Bangladesh has refused to register Rohingya Muslims as refugees.

Nearly 65,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to neighbouring Bangladesh since October when the army launched a crackdown against the Muslim minority after a deadly attack on a military post.

Myanmar says it is acting against perpetrators of the attack, but rights group say the military has been running a systematic campaign of violence against Rohingya in western Rakhine state.

A traumatised Khatun says she never imagined that her family could be ruined in this way.

The camp at Leda looks cramped. The facility is squalid and lacks basic amenities. Children roam around the narrow rows of tin and bamboo huts. They lack access to education, medical care and sanitation.

Ziaur Rahman, a Rohingya rickshaw puller, said many people living in the camps have no money to spend. Rahman, who has been living in the area for the last 15 years, told Al Jazeera he chipped in with some money to help them survive.

Some Rohingya Muslims, who have money, rent space in nearby houses and some are building new houses, he said.

Source – Al Jazeera

Critics call plan to relocate Rohingya refugees from Myanmar to 6,000-acre island “terrible

Bangladesh is pushing ahead with a controversial plan to relocate tens of thousands of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar to a remote island despite warnings it is uninhabitable and prone to flooding.

The government has set up a committee made up of state officials in the coastal districts, ordering authorities to help identify and relocate undocumented Myanmar nationals to Thengar Char in the Bay of Bengal.

“The committee will assist transferring both registered and unregistered refugees from Myanmar to Thengar Char near Hatiya island in Noakhali district,” according to an order issued by the Cabinet Division last week and posted online.

The idea prompted outrage from Rohingya community leaders, while a UN agency said forced relocation would be “very complex and controversial”.

Hatiya is on the estuary of the River Meghna and a nine-hour journey away from camps where the Rohingya have taken shelter.

Some 232,000 Rohingya Muslims – both registered and unregistered – were already living in Bangladesh before more than 65,000 stateless Rohingya fleeing violence in neighbouring Myanmar’s western state of Rakhine began crossing into the country last October.

Most of those who fled to Bangladesh live in squalid conditions in refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar district, which borders Rakhine state and is Bangladesh’s biggest tourist resort.

Bangladesh has also asked officials in the border districts to identify Myanmar nationals who have “illegally infiltrated” the country.

“It has to be assured by taking preventive measures that they (refugees) cannot spread out and mix with the locals,” read the order which was dated January 26.

“The identified refugees should be arrested or pushed back to the camps if they try to go out beyond the assigned boundary.”

Bangladesh first mooted the idea of relocating the refugees in 2015 despite allegations that the island was not ready for human habitation.

‘Terrible idea’
An official in the region criticised the idea, saying the 6,000-acre (2,430-hectare) island was “only accessible during winter and a haven for pirates”.

The authorities were planting trees in a bid to shore up land against high tides and flooding, but those efforts were at least a decade away from completion, the official added.

“It completely inundates during the monsoon,” the official told the AFP news agency, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“It’s a terrible idea to send someone to live there.”

There was no immediate comment from the Rohingya community leaders.

The controversy came as members of Myanmar’s state-appointed body probing violence in Rakhine state visited the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazaar.

Three members of the commission, which is headed by former UN chief Kofi Annan, spoke to refugees who recalled horrific incidents of rape and murder at the hands of Myanmar’s security forces.

Kamal Hossain, 50, told the observer team his entire village was burned to the ground and his brother killed by the army, forcing him to flee to Bangladesh for safety.

“We want to go back home. We don’t want to live as refugees here, but we need assurance that we will not be slaughtered like cattle,” he told AFP.

Dudu Mia, a Rohingya community leader, said he hoped the commissioners would relay to the government in Myanmar that “our people being killed and tortured and women raped by their security forces”.

The team also met with Bangladeshi officials at Cox’s Bazar, and was due to hold talks with the country’s Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina before their departure on February 1.

“The commission came to see for themselves whether these people were forced to come here,” Ali Hossain, chief administrator of the district, told AFP.

Source – Al Jazeera

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