Shoks Mnisi Mzolo – Cii News

The coup d’état regime’s tightening grip, under Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, has deepened Egypt’s economic and social crises, human rights and anti-coup movement March for Justice chairman Prof Nidal Sakr told Cii listeners this morning. Misery and violence, with civilians killed by the military’s live ammunition, are common with the needs of the people ignored by the military regime, which is also mismanaging the North African country, Sakr observed.

In an interview with Sabahul Khair, the exiled political activist also noted that not only has El-Sisi discredited Islam but church has entered the fray in Egypt. He expressed disappointment at the fact that the church was inexplicably trying to rein in the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood, which the church even blames for the murders committed by the Egyptian military dictatorship, should operate or behave.

“The church has spoken out against the Muslim Brotherhood and determining the fate of the Muslim Brotherhood and putting conditions on the Muslim Brotherhood, on how to behave and how to act and what type of adjustments it needs to make to be allowed into the political life. We’ve been having the pope of the church blaming Muslim Brotherhood, actually, for the crime that the murderous military has committed against Christians,” Sakr said, interpreting the dictator’s visit to Kuwait, Egypt’s coup funder, as a sign that Cairo’s finances are in bad shape.

Referring to anti-Islam remarks made by El-Sisi, to motivate what the “religious revolution” propagated by the strongman of Cairo and others, notably the West, and others pushing for Eurocentrism, the professor noted that the dictator said Islamic texts and ideas were antagonising the entire globe. Sakr then quoted El-Sisi, who had said: “‘We must realise that 1.6bn people cannot murder the other 7bn people living on the face of the earth.’ We’ve been having a circus in Egypt, and things that you can never imagine taking place, by this coup (regime),” he said.

El-Sisi’s remarks, condemning Islam, were made before the Al-Azhar and Awqaf Ministry well ahead the birthday of Prophet Muhammad (SAW).

What sparked such comments from El-Sisi, it may be questioned? Part of the foreign-inspired El-Sisi’s multi-faceted project is to “destroy Islam”, on one hand, only to create a “version of Islam that is completely subservient to the West,” asserted the activist, noting the role of the embedded media. The West, with the help of the likes of El-Sisi, he added, was on a mission to manufacture a brand of Islam that is “totally submissive and an Islam that’s defined as ‘harmless’ to the western agenda.” Next on the agenda is the Christianisation of Egypt, the March for Justice leader speculated, adding how a pliant media sector alongside foreign forces with selfish agendas are redefining that country’s landscape.

“Don’t forget that El-Sisi has an elaborate machine of media – channels and so forth – that are all (routing) for him. El-Sisi has been meeting with people in the media, announcers and so forth, almost every other day to set them the agenda and tell them what they should be saying in the media and what kind of culture he wants to cultivate among the population,” Sakr said. “El-Sisi has been focused on creating this sort of sentiment, an anti-Islam sentiment.”

While the United States of America and Israel are often cited as detractors of Islam and the Ummah, as the protracted subjugation of Palestine and ongoing desecration of Al-Aqsa shows, some in the Middle East are cast as culprits. Sakr accused Egypt and Kuwait of maintaining Zionism and the UAE of ridding Islam. “The UAE is sponsoring an elaborate campaign, by the church, to ‘Christianise’ Egypt,” he said, explaining that Cairo has passed a law to enable Christian entities to adopt destitute or orphaned Egyptian children, pegged at 3m. The whole point, argued the professor, is not just about religion but to distort the identity of this African country and dilute or rid Islam.

“This is not a secret, by the way,” the exiled Sakr said. “I, myself, have lectured in the Muslim Brotherhood department and headquarters and political bureaus about the dangers of this, about the American agenda of redefining Islam according to (what the USA wants). This is nothing new. We’ve seen it before in other times, of colonisation and so forth. Nonetheless, the anti-Muslim campaign in Egypt and the entire Muslim world – spearheaded by Egypt and the UAE, by sponsoring all these massacres in Central African Republic Mali and Egypt and Libya and Yemen – is all part of an elaborate campaign.”

 

EXTRACT FROM SISI’s CONTROVERSIAL SPEECH

I am referring here to the religious clerics. We have to think hard about what we are facing—and I have, in fact, addressed this topic a couple of times before. It’s inconceivable that the thinking that we hold most sacred should cause the entire umma [Islamic world] to be a source of anxiety, danger, killing and destruction for the rest of the world. Impossible!

That thinking—I am not saying “religion” but “thinking”—that corpus of texts and ideas that we have sacralized over the years, to the point that departing from them has become almost impossible, is antagonizing the entire world. It’s antagonizing the entire world!

Is it possible that 1.6 billion people [Muslims] should want to kill the rest of the world’s inhabitants—that is 7 billion—so that they themselves may live? Impossible!

I am saying these words here at Al Azhar, before this assembly of scholars and ulema—Allah Almighty be witness to your truth on Judgment Day concerning that which I’m talking about now.

All this that I am telling you, you cannot feel it if you remain trapped within this mindset. You need to step outside of yourselves to be able to observe it and reflect on it from a more enlightened perspective.

I say and repeat again that we are in need of a religious revolution. You, imams, are responsible before Allah. The entire world, I say it again, the entire world is waiting for your next move… because this umma is being torn, it is being destroyed, it is being lost—and it is being lost by our own hands.